Australia launches rules for self-exclusion register and blocks more illegal websites

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Australia has launched the rules for its national self-exclusion register ‘BetStop’ and has instructed operators to get ready to implement the new system. 

Under the rules, interactive wagering providers will be required to promote BetStop through their website, apps and via marketing material.

The rules also detail how wagering providers can find out if their customers are registered with BetStop.

If a customer is registered, the provider must stop offering them wagering services and close their account.

ACMA chair Nerida O’Loughlin: “BetStop will be up and running in the coming months. It is now time for industry to get ready and to have their systems and processes in place to protect their customers.”

BetStop will allow people to register to be excluded from all Australian-licensed online and phone wagering services, such as those offering betting on horseracing or sports, from a period of three months to permanently.

Nerida O’Loughlin, chair of the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), said BetStop will be an important national support mechanism for people who need help to change their gambling habits.

“BetStop will help those at risk of gambling harm to take control of their situation, allowing them to block themselves from all licensed online and phone wagering services in a single process,” O’Loughlin said.

“BetStop will be up and running in the coming months. It is now time for industry to get ready and to have their systems and processes in place to protect their customers and use BetStop,” she added.

Details about BetStop were revealed after ACMA this week requested internet service providers (ISPs) in the country to block access to a further 11 unlicensed gambling websites.

ACMA found Pokie Island, Rich Palms, Lucky Tiger Casino, Megaslot, Bitkingz, Parimatchwin, Casino Rocket, Montecryptos, Cabarino, Jackpot Jill VIP and Robin Roo were all operating in breach of the Interactive Gambling Act 2001 and were therefore illegally offering online gambling in the country.

Website blocking is one of a range of enforcement options available to ACMA to protect Australians against illegal online gambling.

About the author

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Sonja Lindenberg

Sonja Lindenberg is an experienced editor and journalist, with a strong focus on business, finance, trade and investment. She holds a degree in business journalism and throughout the past two decades has covered companies and industries in various markets and for different media, including newspapers, news agencies, inflight magazines, country reports and trade publications. Sonja joined iGaming NEXT in June 2022.

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